Criminal Justice & Criminology
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

News

GS Criminal Justice and Criminology Published in Health Affairs Journal

GS Criminal Justice Associate Professor Chad Posick had a research article published this month by Health Affairs entitled “New Evidence of the Nexus Between Neighborhood Violence, Perceptions of Danger, and Child Health” and co-authored with Dylan B. Jackson and Michael G. Vaughn. Congratulations on the publication!

ABSTRACT: Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with various facets of children’s health. This study explored whether adverse neighborhood conditions—particularly violence exposure and perceptions of danger—were associated with child health status and health risks across four dimensions: health difficulties (for example, headaches, stomachaches, or breathing problems), chronic physical conditions, developmental disorders, and mental health conditions. Data were derived from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, a survey of a cross-sectional weighted probability sample of US children ages 0–17. The findings indicate that neighborhood violence exposure and perceptions of danger yielded the strongest associations with the studied health dimensions and were especially relevant to the occurrence and accumulation of intersecting health problems across dimensions. The findings underscore the need for multiple sectors and agencies to collectively invest in public safety and community violence prevention as a means of promoting health among children.


GS Criminal Justice New Faculty Hire Published by SAGE Publishing

GS Criminal Justice and Criminology new faculty hire for Fall 2019, Kristina Garrity, had a research article published by SAGE Publishing yesterday in their journal Criminal Justice and Behavior, entitled “Understanding Victim Cooperation in Cases of Nonfatal Gun Assaults” co-authored with Natalie Kroovand Hipple, Beth M. Huebner, and Lauren A. Magee. Congratulations on the publication! We are very excited to welcome you to the department!!

ABSTRACT: Victims play a central role in criminal case processing, but research suggests many victims do not report crimes to police or cooperate in a police investigation. This study extends the literature on victim cooperation by examining the effect of incident-level variables and neighborhood characteristics on victim cooperation in nonfatal shooting incidents. The sample includes 1,054 nonfatal shooting victims from two Midwestern cities. Results using binary logistic regression suggest that incident and victim characteristics are significantly associated with cooperation, but race conditions the effect of injury severity and motive on cooperation. The willingness to cooperate among Whites is contingent on injury severity while non-White victims do not become markedly more cooperative when confronted with serious injury. Race also moderates the relationship between crime motive and cooperation. This work demonstrates the need to incorporate nonfatal firearm violence into studies of victim cooperation and gun crime more broadly.


GS Criminal Justice Professors Published in SAGE Journal of Interpersonal Violence

GS Criminal Justice and Criminology Associate Professor Chad Posick and Assistant Professor Jonathan Grubb, along with Dylan B. Jackson, have had a research article published by SAGE Publishing in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence entitled “The Role of Physical and Sexual Assaults on the Ability to Complete Work Responsibilities”. Keep up the great work!

ABSTRACT: Sexual and physical assaults have many serious and persistent negative impacts on individual health. There is now a considerable literature base identifying and discussing these health outcomes. Less is known about the mediating mechanisms that link these types of assault with later outcomes. This study examines the role of sexual and physical assaults in self-perceptions of individual health on missing or cutting back on work responsibilities. In particular, perceptions of both mental and physical health are investigated to further refine understanding of the different impacts of assault on survivor health and behavior. Using a sample of 3,791 adults aged 30 to 84 from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) study, results of the analyses indicate that sexual and physical assaults do not have a direct effect on missing/cutting back on work responsibilities but do have an indirect effect through perceptions of health. The results can inform academic research, as important impacts of assault may be masked if mediating mechanisms are not investigated. In terms of policy, adults who have difficulty carrying out work responsibilities should be assessed for their overall health and survivors of violence should be offered health-related services following a victimization experience.


Dept. of Criminal Justice & Criminology Award Ceremonies 2019

Please join us for our 2019 Award Ceremonies next week! We are celebrating outstanding students, faculty and staff on the Statesboro and Armstrong campuses!


Armstrong’s Ceremony will be held on May 7th, 2019 from 6:00-7:30 PM and Statesboro’s Ceremony will be held May 8th, 2018 from 5:30-7:00 PM. Reception to follow! There will be FREE FOOD at the receptions. See you there!


Armstrong Campus Ceremony

Statesboro Campus Ceremony


Hiring Event: Gwinnett County Police Department

The Gwinnett County Police Department located in metro Atlanta, Georgia is proud to announce its upcoming hiring/recruitment event being held at the Gwinnett County Police Training Center 854 Winder Highway, Lawrenceville, GA on Saturday May 18, 2019 – Sunday May 19, 2019 (8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M.).

This is an opportunity for prospective candidates to apply and complete the first half of the hiring process.  During the event applicants will participate in an orientation, physical fitness assessment, and interview. The Gwinnett County Police Department is interested in recruiting college students for this exciting career opportunity.


Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology • PO Box 8105 • Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-8007 • cjcrim@georgiasouthern.edu