Criminal Justice & Criminology
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences

News

Visiting Instructor Position Available – Starting Fall 2019

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia Southern University has a Visiting Instructor position open for which we seek to make a hire for the 2019-20 academic year. This position is located on the Statesboro campus and starts AUGUST 1, 2019. Applicants with college or university teaching experience and strengths or experience in Homeland Security/Terrorism and/or Research Methods/Statistics are preferred.


2018-2019 Department Award Winners on the Statesboro Campus

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology held its first annual award ceremony to recognize the accomplishments of students, faculty, and staff on the Statesboro campus on May 8, 2019. The following individuals were recognized:

Eleanor Williams, Outstanding Junior in Criminal Justice and Criminology

Ernest Zittrouer, Outstanding Graduate Student

Candace Widener, Outstanding Intern Award

Erin Holloway, Justice Studies Club Award

Prof. Barbara King and Dr. Chad Posick, Faculty Award of Excellence

Ms. Laurie Hartlett, Staff Award of Excellence

Amani Mitchell and Sherrod Hollingshed, Richard J. Waugh Justice Studies Award


2018-2019 Department Award Winners on the Armstrong Campus

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology held its first annual award ceremony to recognize the accomplishments of students, faculty, and staff on the Armstrong campus on May 7, 2019. The following individuals were recognized:

Brandi Jernigan, Outstanding Junior in Criminal Justice and Criminology

Wesley Dasher, Outstanding Cybercrime Undergraduate Student

Jazzmine Jones, Outstanding Cybercrime Graduate Student

Katherine Deady, Outstanding Intern Award

Dr. Kevin Jennings, Faculty Award of Excellence

Ms. Marti Baker, Staff Award of Excellence

Wesley Dasher, Menzel-Magnus Award


Dr. Chad Posick Published in Health Affairs Journal

Associate Professor Chad Posick had a research article published this month by Health Affairs entitled “New Evidence of the Nexus Between Neighborhood Violence, Perceptions of Danger, and Child Health” and co-authored with Dylan B. Jackson and Michael G. Vaughn. 

ABSTRACT: Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with various facets of children’s health. This study explored whether adverse neighborhood conditions—particularly violence exposure and perceptions of danger—were associated with child health status and health risks across four dimensions: health difficulties (for example, headaches, stomachaches, or breathing problems), chronic physical conditions, developmental disorders, and mental health conditions. Data were derived from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, a survey of a cross-sectional weighted probability sample of US children ages 0–17. The findings indicate that neighborhood violence exposure and perceptions of danger yielded the strongest associations with the studied health dimensions and were especially relevant to the occurrence and accumulation of intersecting health problems across dimensions. The findings underscore the need for multiple sectors and agencies to collectively invest in public safety and community violence prevention as a means of promoting health among children.


New Faculty Hire Kristina Garrity Published in Criminal Justice and Behavior

GS Criminal Justice and Criminology new faculty hire for Fall 2019, Kristina Garrity, had a research article published in the journal Criminal Justice and Behavior, entitled “Understanding Victim Cooperation in Cases of Nonfatal Gun Assaults” co-authored with Natalie Kroovand Hipple, Beth M. Huebner, and Lauren A. Magee. 

ABSTRACT: Victims play a central role in criminal case processing, but research suggests many victims do not report crimes to police or cooperate in a police investigation. This study extends the literature on victim cooperation by examining the effect of incident-level variables and neighborhood characteristics on victim cooperation in nonfatal shooting incidents. The sample includes 1,054 nonfatal shooting victims from two Midwestern cities. Results using binary logistic regression suggest that incident and victim characteristics are significantly associated with cooperation, but race conditions the effect of injury severity and motive on cooperation. The willingness to cooperate among Whites is contingent on injury severity while non-White victims do not become markedly more cooperative when confronted with serious injury. Race also moderates the relationship between crime motive and cooperation. This work demonstrates the need to incorporate nonfatal firearm violence into studies of victim cooperation and gun crime more broadly.


Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology • PO Box 8105 • Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-8007 • cjcrim@georgiasouthern.edu