Current Graduate Programs

The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology offers two degree programs structured both for students seeking careers or professional advancement in the criminal justice field and for students who ultimately wish to pursue an advanced degree in criminal justice/criminology. The degrees are offered through a variety of formats to enhance our availability to the students seeking these careers.

Criminal Justice and Criminology Degree
M.S. with a major in Criminal Justice and Criminology

Criminal Justice and Criminology Certificate
Graduate Cybercrime Certificate

Master of Science

Criminal Justice and Criminology, M.S.
Degree Requirements: 36 Hours

Admission Standards

Regular Admission
Admission to this program is competitive. At a minimum, for regular admission the applicant must have:

1. A Bachelor’s degree from an appropriately accredited, four-year institution in criminal justice/criminology or related field (that adequately prepares students for success in this field. This application requirement will be waived for applicants who successfully complete the Graduate Cybercrime Certificate.)
2. A 2.75 cumulative grade point average or higher on completed requirements for a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. (This application requirement will be waived for applicants who successfully complete the Graduate Cybercrime Certificate.)
3. Minimum GRE scores of 146 on the verbal section and 145 on the quantitative section or between a 3.5-4.0 on the analytical section. (This application requirement will be waived for applicants who successfully complete the Graduate Cybercrime Certificate.)
4. Letter of Application detailing: a) academic background and/or professional credentials, b) relevant research and work experience, c) career goals and reasons for enrollment in this program.
5. Two letters of recommendation addressing the applicant’s: 1) academic work; 2) professional experience, if any; 3) ability to handle master’s level curriculum, and 4) how the applicant can be expected to contribute to the program. (This application requirement will be waived for applicants who successfully complete the Graduate Cybercrime Certificate.)

Provisional Admission
Applicants who meet two out of the three requirements outlined for GPA and GRE scores may be granted provisional admission by the graduate faculty committee based on careful review of additional materials submitted.

Reclassification
A student may be reclassified with regular admission providing that they have completed three program or related courses (9 hours), approved by their advisor, with a grade of no less than B. Additional courses may be required to be completed prior to a student’s reclassification that do not contribute to these nine hours (such as taking an undergraduate statistics course to prepare for graduate statistics). No more than nine hours may be earned under the provisional admission classification. After nine hours, the student must either be reclassified as a regular admission student or be removed from the program.

Prerequisites for Admission
While an undergraduate degree in criminal justice is not a prerequisite to admission, newly-admitted students must be deemed adequately prepared for graduate study in this essentially multidisciplinary area. Students who lack the necessary background may be required to complete additional undergraduate coursework. For example, students who have not successfully completed an undergraduate statistics course may be required to do so prior to enrollment in graduate statistical analysis or research methods courses.

Standards of Progression and Graduation
A. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 overall grade point average in all graduate courses. A student will be placed on academic probation if he or she earns one (1) C or below. If a student earns two (2) C’s or below, the student will be dismissed from the program. There is a one (1) semester waiting period after the first C is earned so that the student has the opportunity to replace the grade and get the GPA back to a 3.0. The student may repeat a class only once to replace a grade.
B. Each student must file a program of study and an application for graduation with Graduate Studies. Fifty percent of the program of study must be completed at the 6000-8000 levels.
C. If any change in the approved program of study is required, an amended program of study, signed by the student and advisor, must be submitted to Graduate Studies.
D. Satisfactory completion of a written comprehensive assessment one semester prior to graduation for the coursework option students is required. Students choosing the thesis option must receive a satisfactory score on a formal thesis defense. Students completing practicum must receive a passing grade on the paper required for completion of the course.
E. Students are encouraged to apply for graduation two semesters before the anticipated date of graduation. Note: A copy of the official program of study must accompany the candidate’s application.
F. All degree requirements must be completed within seven years.

Program of Study
The program is offered via two different tracks. The traditional track primarily is offered in a seated format, with some opportunities to take hybrid or online courses. The online track allows students to complete the degree requirements utilizing an online delivery method. Students will opt into one of three concentrations, depending on the track they select.

Core Requirements: 12 hours

CRJU 6801 Proseminar in Criminal Justice & Criminology
CRJU 7631 Criminological Theory
CRJU 6811 Criminal Justice Systems: Leadership, Management, and Policy
Also select a research/analysis tools course (such as: CRJU 7434: Quantitative Research Design, CRJU 7436: Qualitative Research Design, CRJU 7437: Statistics for Social Science; or other analytical tools course as approved by advisor and program coordinator).

Advanced Work: 18 hours

  • Select a second research/analysis tools course (approved by advisor).

In conjunction with their advisor and program coordinator, select from the concentrations below to complete the final 15 hours of advanced coursework.

  • Criminal Justice: two criminal justice electives, one criminology elective, and two free electives (traditional and online tracks)
  • Criminology: two criminology electives, one criminal justice elective, and two free electives (traditional track).
  • Cybercrime: three cybercrime electives, one criminal justice elective, and one criminology elective (online track).

Capstone Options: 6 hours
Students select from three capstone options to complete their final 6 hours of the program:

  • Thesis Option: Recommended for students who seek to do research for public and
    non-profit agencies or who seek further educational opportunities, such as a Ph.D. Students must pass the thesis defense.
  • Practicum: Recommended for students who seek employment in justice system or adjacent systems’ agencies. Students will complete an internship, approved by their advisor and the program coordinator, completing all tasks associated with the internship option. Students will complete a comprehensive paper as part of this course, and must earn a passing score on this paper.
  • Free Electives: Recommended for students who seek additional substantive information relative to their career track. Specific courses must be approved by their advisor and the program director. Students selecting this option must earn a passing grade on a comprehensive exam.

Total Credit Hours: 36

The M.S. Student Handbook describes additional relevant information for the degree requirements.

Graduate Cybercrime Certificate

The Graduate Cybercrime Certificate is a post-baccalaureate certificate program that may be completed fully online. However, some courses available in the traditional format also are classified to meet requirements within this certificate program. This program provides students with specialized skills in cybercrime and digital forensics. All courses in the cybercrime certificate program may be applied to the online cybercrime concentration of the Master of Science with a major in Criminal Justice and Criminology.

The Cybercrime Certificate is the only one of its kind offered in this region.

Degree Requirements: 18 Hours

Admission Standards

Regular Admission
Admission to this program is competitive. At a minimum, for admission to the certificate program, the applicant must have:

1. A baccalaureate degree from an appropriately accredited four-year institution (with a major that adequately prepares students for success in this field).
2. A minimum of 2.75 overall undergraduate GPA.
3. A letter of application detailing: a) academic background, b) relevant experience, c) career goals and objectives relative to enrollment in this program.
4. A current resume providing details of relevant education and work experience.

Provisional Admission
Applicants who meet two out of the three requirements outlined for GPA and GRE scores may be granted provisional admission by the graduate faculty committee based on a careful review of additional materials submitted.

Reclassification
A student may be reclassified with regular admission providing that they have completed two program or related courses (6 hours), approved by their advisor, with a grade of no less than B. Additional courses may be required to be completed prior to a student’s reclassification that do not contribute to these nine hours (such as taking an undergraduate statistics course to prepare for graduate statistics). No more than nine hours may be earned under the provisional admission classification. After nine hours, the student must either be reclassified as a regular admission student or be removed from the program.

Standards of Progression and Graduation
1. A grade of “C” or better is required to receive credit for certificate program courses.
2. Students must earn a minimum grade point average of 3.0 or better for the certificate to be awarded.
3. Students must file a program of study with Graduate Studies upon completion of the requirements for the Certificate.
4. Students must meet the requirements set forth by COGS for certificate programs.

Program of Study

Select six CRJU courses labeled as a content area for Cybercrime.

Course Information

Subject Course Number Course Title Catalog Description
CRJU 5003G Cyber Forensics Application of computer investigation and analysis techniques to gather evidence suitable for presentation in a court of law. Techniques of cybercrime scene analysis, media analysis, and the use of various forensic tools. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper or project based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJU 5003G and 5010G.
CRJU 5010G Applied Digital Forensics I Identification, capture, and recording of evidence from suspect and victim’s computer hard drives and laptops. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper, project, or presentation based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJU 5003G and CRJU 5010G.
CRJU 5020G Applied Digital Forensics II Expansion of the identification, capture, and recording of evidence from suspect and victim’s mobile devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and PDAs. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper, presentation, or project based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.” Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in CRJU 5010G.
CRJU 5060G Special Topics in Cybercrime Examines substantive topics, problems, and issues of importance to contemporary study of cybercrime. Topics announced when course is scheduled. Course may be repeated if substantially different. Graduate students are required to complete an additional research paper or project based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 5360G Hackers, Malware, and Online Economic Crime Examines cybercrimes that are often influenced by either curiosity or financial motivation. Topics include, but are not limited to, the subculture of computer hackers, the role of malicious software in computer intrusions, and different types of online economic fraud. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper or project based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 5361G Cybercrimes against Persons and Society Examines cybercrimes in which violence is threatened or exerted against individuals or society. Topics include, but are not limited to, cyber harassment and stalking, pornography, child pornography and exploitation, and cyber terrorism. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research project or paper based on course objectives. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 6060 Current Issues in Cybercrime Examines current cybercrime issues in the news, such as data breaches and recent computer intrusions. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper or project. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 6080 Seminar in Transnational Crime Special topics concerning illegal activities of international criminal organizations and the effect of transnational crime on the economic and socio-political environment in countries across the globe. Explores linkages between various crime groups, role of government corruption, and terrorism. Specific topics will be specified upon offering. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 6801 Proseminar in Criminal Justice and Criminology Introduces students to current research and critical issues in the administration of justice and criminological theory. Includes discussions of ethics and professional development for the field.
CRJU 6811 Criminal Justice Systems: Leadership, Management, and Policy Intersection of crime and policy process with particular attention on development of public policy and its impact on society. Includes exploration of organizational and managerial issues associate with the criminal justice system components.
CRJU 7080 Seminar in Victimization Explores special topics in victimization, placing attention on historical contexts, forms, theoretical frameworks, and victim-offender overlap. May focus on specific type or particular context of victimization. Specific topics will be specified upon offering. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7090 Topics in Violence and Crime In-depth analysis of selected topics on violence and crime. Analysis may include, but is not limited to, examination of nature, prevelance, causes and consequences of violence. Specific topics will be identified upon offering of course. Courses may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7434 Quantitative Research Design This course focuses on the study of the role of theory, research design, sampling, measurement and instrumentation, data collection, and ethical issues related to social scientific research.
CRJU 7436 Qualitative Research Design This course addresses the analysis and practice of qualitative methodology in social science. Topics may include participant observation, ethnographic methods, interviews, case studies, content analysis, archival research and other innovative techniques.
CRJU 7437 Statistics for Social Science This course addresses the techniques and statistics necessary to design and interpret quantitative social scientific research.
CRJU 7631 Criminological Theory Examines major theoretical perspectives in classical and contemporary criminology, including but not limited to: control, learning, strain, labeling, rational choice, conflict and theoretical integration. The socio-political and historical context in which these theories were developed is also considered.
CRJU 7632 Seminar in Criminal Justice This course explores a selected topic in criminal justice of interest to groups of students, including, but not limited to policing, corrections, courts, or the law, which are relevant to their course of specialization in the graduate curricula of the University. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7633 Seminar in Criminology This course focuses on the exploration of a selected topic in criminology of interest to groups of students which are relevant to their course of specialization in the graduate curricula of the University. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7695 Seminar on Crimes and Public Policy Provides an examination of the effects of public policies on crime trends and the control of crime. Specific attention is paid to the development of criminal justice policies and their consequences for the criminal justice system and society at large. Specific crimes and/or policies will be identified upon offering of course. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7822 Seminar in Law Enforcement In-depth analysis of selected topics in the enforcement of laws in a system of ordered liberty. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7842 Seminar on Issues in Justice Administration Analysis of the unique contexts of management in the justice system and specific agency types. Emphasizes experiences and delimmas of individuals working in these organizations, as well as organizational standards and guiding principles of professionalism. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7843 Special Topics in Corrections and Offender Supervision In-depth analysis of selected topics in corrections within a larger system of ordered liberty. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7853 Seminar in Law and Courts In-depth analysis of selected topics in the role and operation of law and courts in a system of ordered liberty. Course may be repeated when topic is different.
CRJU 7864 Legal Aspects of Cybercrime Examination of laws related to computers, cell phones, other electronic devices, and the internet. Evaluation of computer misuse crimes, traditional crimes committed using computers, punishment and sentencing issues, Fourth Amendment issues, jurisdiction at state and federal levels, international computer crime, and national security. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 7865 First Responder Tools and Applications Examines basic computer forensic tools and applications including seizure, imaging and analysis of computer media with reference to computer hard drive and forms of storage. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 7866 Readings in Cybercrime Readings in Cybercrime” Course description change: “Examination of the foundational works in cybercrime with a focus on the hacker ethic. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 7867 Cyber Ethics and Internet Culture Application of ethical theory to 21st century issues, such as music piracy, cyber warfare, and cyber stalking. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 7868 Cyber Criminology Assessment of the usefulness of traditional criminological theories to explain cybercrime, new theories created to better explain cybercrime andmeasures to control such crimes. This course serves as a content area for Cybercrime.
CRJU 7880 Practicum I Educational placement designed for research observation and practical experience in a select criminal justice agency. May be used to satisfy Cybercrime Track or Certificate with permission of Advisor and instructor.
CRJU 7881 Practicum II Educational placement designed for research observation and practical experience in a select criminal justice agency. May be used to satisfy Cybercrime Trakck or Certificate with permission of Advisor and Instructor. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CRJU 7880.
CRJU 7891 Independent Study This course is an independent examination of graduate course topics offered in the criminal justice and criminology curriculum of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology following guidelines of the College of Graduate Studies.
CRJU 7892 Directed Research This course requires participation in an independent or group research project. More than three hours of credit for directed research may be earned, but only three hours may be applied to the completion of minimum hours required for the M.S. Degree with a major in Criminal Justice and Criminology.
CRJU 7999 Thesis Critical and analytical research thesis examining approved criminal justice or criminology topic is produced.
CRJU 8830 Seminar in Juvenile Justice Assessment of policies and practices of agencies processing youthful offenders. Addresses current issues and trends impacting juvenile delinquency and crime and system responses. Specific topic will be identified upon offering. Course may be repeated when topic is different.

Last updated: 9/6/2018

Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology • PO Box 8105 • Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-8007 • cjcrim@georgiasouthern.edu