Current Undergraduate Programs

Criminal Justice and Criminology B.S.

Degree Requirements:  124 Credit Hours
See Core Curriculum for required courses in Area A1 through Area E.

Area F – Courses Appropriate to Major 18 hours
CRJU    1100        Introduction To Criminal Justice 3
CRJU    2010        Universal Justice 3
CRJU    2210        Introduction to Policing 3
CRJU    2410        Introduction to Corrections 3

Select 6 credit hours from the following:

*Select an additional course if CRJU 2010 was taken and utilized to satisfy Area B.

6 hours
ANTH    1102    Introduction to Anthropology
CRJU    1130    Interpersonal Communication Skills
CSCI    2070    Introduction to Computer Ethics
INTS    2130    Introduction to International Studies
ITEC    1310    Programming for Info/Tech (must take MATH 1111)
POLS    2101    Introduction to Political Science
PSYC    1101    Introduction to Psychology
SOCI    1101    Introduction to Sociology
Major Requirements 12 hours
CRJU    3110         Legal Process 3
CRJU    3120        Ethics in Criminal Justice 3
CRJU    3234        Research Methods 3
CRJU    3420        Applying Elementary Statistics in Crime and Justice Research* 3

*Students may take MATH 2200 as a substitute for this course.

Two tracks are available within this degree program:

  • Criminal Justice and Criminology Track
  • Cybercrime Track**

 The requirements for these two tracks are presented separately.

Criminal Justice and Criminology Track

Track Specific Requirements  33 hours
CRJU       3233       Criminology 3
Select 3 credit hours from the following: 3
CRJU       3131        Criminal Law
CRJU       3133        Evidence and Procedure
Capstone Course
Select 3 credit hours from the following: 3
CRJU       4910       Senior Seminar
CRJU       4791        Internship* (See program notations)
HONS      4610       Honors Thesis
Upper Division Criminal Justice and Criminology Electives: 18 Hours
Select 18 hours from the following: 18
CRJU     3134     Investigations
CRJU    3160     Corporate Crime
CRJU    3170     Criminal Justice Administration
CRJU    3263     Cyber Criminology
CRJU     3431     Juvenile Justice
CRJU     3432     Gangs and Society
CRJU     3531     Victimology
CRJU     3534     Drugs and Society
CRJU     3535     Family Violence
CRJU     3536     School Violence
CRJU     3538     Gender, Crime, and Justice
CRJU     3631     Crime and Justice in Public Policy
CRJU     3732     Conflict Resolution
CRJU     3733     Inequalities, Crime, and Justice
CRJU     3831     Popular Culture and Justice
CRJU     3931     Issues in Homeland Security
CRJU     4031     Community-Based Supervision and  Treatment
CRJU    4092     Special Topics in Criminology
CRJU    4093     Special Topics in Criminal Justice
CRJU     4135     Directed Study in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CRJU     4137     Law, Justice, and Society
CRJU     4531     Comparative Justice Systems
CRJU     4532     Organized Crime in a Global Society
CRJU     4639     Inside-Out
CRJU     4792     Internship
CRJU    5003     Cyber Forensics
CRJU    5010     Applied Digital Forensics I
CRJU    5020     Applied Digital Forensics II
CRJU    5060     Special Topics in Cybercrime
CRJU    5360     Hackers, Malware, and Online Economic Crime
CRJU    5361     Cybercrimes against Persons and Society
Social Science Multidisciplinary Electives: 6 Hours
Select 6 credit hours of upper division social science and related courses.  (Upper division social science and related courses may include courses from Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, Public Administration, International Studies, and Legal Studies. History and philosophy courses and other courses also may be included, with permission of the student’s major advisor.)
Free Electives: 15 Hours
Select 15 credit hours of free electives.

Cybercrime Track

Track Specific Requirements 36 hours
CRJU    1210    Introduction to Cybercrime 3
CRJU    5010    Applied Digital Forensics I 3
CRJU    5020    Applied Digital Forensics II 3
Select 3 credit hours from the following two courses: 3

CRJU    3263    Cyber Criminology

CRJU    3233    Criminology

Select 3 credit hours from the following two courses: 3

CRJU    3131    Criminal Law

CRJU    3133    Evidence and Procedure

Capstone Course 3
Select 3 credit hours from the following:
CRJU    4910    Senior Seminar
CRJU    4792    Internship* (See program notations)
HONS    4610    Honors Thesis

Upper Division Criminal Justice and Criminology Electives:

Select at least 3 hours from the following Cybercrime electives:

12

3

CRJU    3263    Cyber Criminology
CRJU    5060    Special Topics in Cybercrime
CRJU    5360    Hackers, Malware, and Online Economic Crime
CRJU    5361    Cybercrimes against Persons and Society

Select up to 9 hours from the following:                                                                  9

(Students are strongly encouraged to take CRJU 3160 Corporate Crime, CRJU 4531 Comparative Justice Systems, and CRJU 3931 Issues in Homeland Security when possible.)

CRJU    3134    Investigations
CRJU    3160    Corporate Crime
CRJU    3170    Criminal Justice Administration
CRJU    3431    Juvenile Justice
CRJU    3432    Gangs and Society
CRJU    3531    Victimology
CRJU    3534    Drugs and Society
CRJU    3535    Family Violence
CRJU    3536    School Violence
CRJU    3538    Gender, Crime, and Justice
CRJU    3631    Crime and Justice in Public Policy
CRJU    3732    Conflict Resolution
CRJU    3733    Inequalities, Crime, and Justice
CRJU    3831    Popular Culture and Justice
CRJU    3931    Issues in Homeland Security
CRJU    4031    Community-Based Supervision and  Treatment
CRJU    4092    Special Topics in Criminology
CRJU    4093    Special Topics in Criminal Justice
CRJU    4135    Directed Study in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CRJU    4137    Law, Justice, and Society
CRJU    4531    Comparative Justice Systems
CRJU    4532    Organized Crime in a Global Society
CRJU    4639    Inside-Out
CRJU    4792    Internship in Criminal Justice
Technology and Social Science Multidisciplinary Electives: 6

CSCI    1150    Fundamentals of the Internet*

*If CSCI is utilized to fulfill a core requirement, students should take 6 credit hours, rather than 3, of the upper division technology and/or social science/related courses as identified below.

 Select 3 credit hours of upper division technology and/or social science/related courses.

 (Students enrolled in the Cybercrime Track are encouraged to take upper division technology courses from IT, computer science, and LSTD. Social science and related courses may include courses from Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, Public Administration, International Studies, and Legal Studies. History and philosophy courses and other courses also may be included. Course selection should be done in consultation with the student’s major advisor.)

 Free Electives:  Select 12 credit hours of free electives. 12

Program Notations

 Please note: The Criminal Justice and Criminology Track is offered on both the Armstrong and Statesboro campuses. However, the Cybercrime Track currently is available only on the Armstrong campus (while some courses may be taken on the Statesboro campus). Also note that not all electives are offered on each campus.

*Internship: Students may take 3, 6, or 9 credits of Internship. For internships over 3 hours, students may utilize up to 6 credit hours to count towards fulfilling the Upper Division Criminal Justice and Criminology Electives requirement, while 3 credit hours may be counted towards the Free Electives requirement. Students must work with their advisor to determine the placement of these hours.

**Cybercrime Track: Is only offered on the Armstrong Campus.

Other Program Requirements

 A minimum grade of “C” is required for each Area F, CRJU, and multidisciplinary requirements course taken in the major. This applies to all courses (lower and upper division). If advisor recommends.

Honors in Criminal Justice and Criminology

 To graduate with Honors in Criminal Justice and Criminology, a student must:

  • be admitted to the University Honors Program;
  • successfully complete at least three credit hours of HONS 4610 over three semesters;
  • successfully complete and present an Honors Thesis or Capstone Project;
  • be in good standing in the University Honors Program

Advisement

All Criminal Justice and Criminology majors, including students in the UHP, are advised by an advisor assigned to the major.

The program offers two minors: Criminal Justice & Criminology and Cyber Crime.

All courses in either minor require a C or better

Criminal Justice and Criminology Minor

Total Minor Credit Hours 18 hours
Prerequisite(s)
CRJU    1100        Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
Minor Program
CRJU    3233        Criminology 3
Select 12 credit hours from the following: 12
CRJU    Major requirements courses
CRJU    Upper division courses

Cybercrime Minor

Total Minor Credit Hours 18 hours
Minor Program
CRJU    1100        Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CRJU    1210        Introduction to Cybercrime 3
ITEC    1310        Programming for Information Technology*
*Requires MATH1111 in Core Area A
3
CRJU    5010        Applied Digital Forensics I 3
CRJU    5020        Applied Digital Forensics II 3
Select 3 credit hours from the following: 3
CRJU    3263        Cyber Criminology
CRJU    5060        Special Topics in Cybercrime
CRJU    5361        Hackers, Malware, and Online Economic Crime
CRJU    5361U     Cybercrimes against Persons and Society
Subject Course Number Course Title Catalog Description
CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice Provides an introduction and overview of the criminal justice system and its central components: police, courts, and corrections. Topics include: the history, development, and current status of law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections in the U.S.; the philosophical, economic, and socio-political aspects of the criminal justice system and processes; individual rights and public order; an introduction to the juvenile justice system; theories of crime causation; and special issues such as drugs, mental health and public policy. Cross listing(s): CRJUH 1100.
CRJU 1100H Introduction to Criminal Justice (Honors) Provides an introduction and overview of the criminal justice system and its central components: police, courts, and corrections. Topics include: the history, development, and current status of law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections in the U.S.; the philosophical, economic, and socio-political aspects of the criminal justice system and processes; individual rights and public order; an introduction to the juvenile justice system; theories of crime causation; and special issues such as drugs, mental health and public policy.Cross listing(s): CRJU 1100.”
CRJU 1130 Interpersonal Communication Skills Development of interpersonal communication skills to improve interaction among agency employees and between employees and the public.
CRJU 1210 Introduction to Cybercrime History of cybercrime and the examination of techniques and strategies for investigating computer crime.
CRJU 2010 Universal Justice Critical juxtaposition of the justice ideal in actual practice in the U.S. and other countries. Development of universal justice construct rooted in the rule of law and applicable to terrorism, piracy, international criminal conspiracy, immigration, sanctuary, asylum, amnesty, and war crimes.
CRJU 2010H Universal Justice (Honors) Critical juxtaposition of the justice ideal in actual practice in the U.S. and other countries. Development of universal justice construct rooted in the rule of law and applicable to terrorism, piracy, international criminal conspiracy, immigration, sanctuary, asylum, amnesty, and war crimes.
CRJU 2210 Introduction to Policing Critical examination and assessment of American policing. Major emphases include policing history, functions, organizational structure, policing strategies, effectiveness of practices, and accountability measures.
CRJU 2410 Introduction to Corrections Correctional process and interventions designed to deter and control adult criminal behavior. Addresses philosophy and goals underlying correctional interventions, types of criminal sentencing, and penal sanctions, including community-based programs, institutional corrections, and parole. Examines intentions and consequences of various methods of institutional and non-institutional processing and treatment of convicted offenders.
CRJU 3110 Legal Process This course will iIntroduces students to the American court system with a focus on the sources of law and the actors, institutions, and processes that affect the administration of justice. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3111H Honors Thesis Seminar I In a seminar setting, students will conduct readings about the research process with a focus on developing an honors thesis proposal. Prerequisite(s): Minimum junior standing.
CRJU 3112H Honors Thesis Seminar II In a seminar setting, students will conduct readings about the research process with a focus on developing an honors thesis proposal. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in CRJU 3111H; minimum junior standing.
CRJU 3120 Ethics in Criminal Justice Provides an overview of ethical theories and understandings of justice in the context of contemporary issues related to the criminal justice system. Students practice identifying ethical dilemmas and applying major ethical systems to resolve dilemmas and evaluate decision-making in law enforcement, the judiciary, and the correctional system. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” and prior or concurrent enrollment in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3131 Criminal Law Examines the social and political influences on criminal law in the United States. Analyzes the constitutional limits on criminal law, principles of criminal liability, elements of crimes, criminal defenses, and the application of the Georgia Criminal Code to specific crimes. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3133 Evidence and Procedure Focuses on the legal processes from arrest through appeal, with emphasis on the rights of the accused including due process, right to counsel, search and seizure, self-incrimination, and the rules of evidence governing criminal procedure. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3134 Investigations Introduces students to fundamentals of conducting investigations. Topics include: evidence gathering, interviews and interrogations, court preparation and testimony, and written reports. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in CRJU 1100 or CRJU 1100S
CRJU 3160 Corporate Crime Study of the laws, law enforcement, victimization, and cost of corporate, white collar and occupational crime. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3170 Criminal Justice Administration Survey of basic concepts and principles concerned with the administration and management of agencies within the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on organizational structure, functions, standard operating procedures, leadership, and the role of discretion.
CRJU 3233 Criminology Examines the nature and extent of crime in the U.S. Evaluates factors leading to criminal behavior drawing on major criminological theories and research, as well as measures proposed to control crime.
CRJU 3233H Criminology (Honors) Examines the nature and extent of crime in the U.S. Evaluates factors leading to criminal behavior drawing on major criminological theories and research, as well as measures proposed to control crime.
CRJU 3234 Research Methods Provides an overview of research methods and techniques in criminal justice and criminology, to include research design, analytical techniques, ethical issues in research, and relationships between theory, research, and practice. Particular topics include the nature of conceptualization, hypothesis testing, measurement, operationalization, and sampling populations to provide students with conceptual and practical foundations to develop research and program evaluation skills. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3263 Cyber Criminology Assesses the usefulness of classic criminological theories to explain a wide range of cybercrimes and the possible need for the creation of new cyber-related criminological theories. Prerequisites or co-requisite(s): CRJU 1210 or approval of instructor.
CRJU 3420 Applying Elementary Statistics in Justice and Crime Research Students learn about and practice using elementary statistics with a focus on crime and criminal justice data and usage. Focuses on linking levels of measurement, inference, questions posed, and data limitations in statistical usage. Students will compute statistics, review problems and select the appropriate statistical tools, and interpret statistics.
CRJU 3431 Juvenile Justice Provides an overview of the juvenile justice system and juvenile jurisprudence. Examines the development of the juvenile justice system and treatment of juveniles in civil and criminal justice systems. Additional topics include examination of theoretical frameworks and correlates of juvenile delinquency as well as strategies aimed at reducing and preventing delinquency.
CRJU 3432 Gangs and Society This course examines the historical development and contemporary influence of gangs as well as their criminal and noncriminal activities. Emphasis is placed on myths associated with gangs, individual and structural forces influencing juveniles to join gangs, differentiating gangs from other organized criminal groups, how gangs fit into society as a whole, the impact of gangs on the criminal justice system, and the effectiveness of policies and initiatives aimed at reducing gang activity. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3531 Victimology An examination of the causes, consequences, and theoretical explanations of victimization. Major emphases on victimization patterns, risk factors, the victim-offender relationship, range of injuries experienced, and the role of the victim in criminal justice proceedings. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3531H Victimology (Honors) An examination of the causes, consequences, and theoretical explanations of victimization. Major emphases on victimization patterns, risk factors, the victim-offender relationship, range of injuries experienced, and the role of the victim in criminal justice proceedings. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3534 Drugs and Society This course introduces students to the scholarly study of drugs and alcohol from a multidisciplinar, liberal arts perspective. Students will become familiar with drug discourse, history, and policy with particular emphases on the legal prohibitions and enforcement of drugs in American Society.
CRJU 3535 Family Violence This course provides an examination of family violence with specific focus on child abuse, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. Attention centers on the nature, prevalence, causes, consequences, as well as on responses by social service agencies and the criminal justice system for each form of violence occurring within the family. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3535H Family Violence (Honors) This course provides an examination of family violence with specific focus on child abuse, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. Attention centers on the nature, prevalence, causes, consequences, as well as on responses by social service agencies and the criminal justice system for each form of violence occurring within the family.Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3536 School Violence This course provides an examination of school violence, focusing on the school as the location for various forms victimization of students, teachers, and school administrators. Specifically, the course will focus on several forms of school violence including bullying and school shootings. Theoretical explanations, administrative, and criminal justice responses to the various forms of school violence, and the consequences of these responses, will be examined.
CRJU 3538 Gender, Crime, and Justice Critical examination of gender as a significant, yet overlooked, dimension of criminality to include the nature and extent of women as victims, offenders, and workers in the criminal justice system. Causes of crime and victimization, gender disparities in processing/punishing female offenders, treatment of female offenders in the community, responses to female victimization, and ways to reduce both crime and victimization will be examined, while promoting justice by recognizing the important role of gender and the intersection of gender and other social inequalities.
CRJU 3631 Crime and Justice in Public Policy Focuses on the intersection of crime and social justice in the policy process. Particular attendion is paid to the development of public policy, actors in the process, and the impact of public policy on society, social programs, and the criminal justice system.
CRJU 3732 Conflict Resolution Examines the causes of conflict and techniques to resolve conflict in the criminal justice system. Studies conflict among colleagues, the public, and with clients in the criminal justice field are a focus, as well as how criminal justice agencies (police, courts, and corrections) resolve conflict. Special emphases on collaborative resolutions, restorative justice/peace making, community policing, mediation, arbitration, and development of interpersonal communication skills within and between agencies.
CRJU 3733 Inequalities, Crime, and Justice Introduces forms of social stratification and inequalities and their intersection crime and justice. Attention is given to race, class, and gender inequalities within the United States criminal justice system and the paths into contemporary inequality. The impacts of the extent, causes, and generation of institutionalized inequalities on criminal justice processes, victimization, and system employment are explored. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 3831 Popular Culture & Justice Examines portrayals of crime, justice, social stratification, the criminal justice system, as well as social and political responses to those issues, in television, film, and literature.
CRJU 3931 Issues in Homeland Security Explores the legal, practical, and ethical challenges that accompany efforts to secure the homeland against major twenty-first threats such as terrorism and cyber-terrorism. Course topics may include but not be limited to: threat assessment, crisis response, incident prevention, and the need to reconcile governmental strategies for disrupting attacks on the homeland with the imperative of protecting civil liberties.
CRJU 4031 Community-Based Supervision and Treatment Examines alternatives to incarceration and methods of treatment in non-institutional settings. Focus is on supervising criminal offenders in the community and theories/techniques employed to influence and alter attitudes, values, and behavior. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4092 Special Topics in Criminology Periodically scheduled to allow exploration of contemporary substantive topics related to criminology and crime that are not offered in the regular curriculum. Topics will be announced when the course is scheduled. Repeatable if topic is substantially different. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4093 Special Topics in Criminal Justice Periodically offered to facilitate exploration of contemporary topics related to law enforcement, courts, corrections, or justice administration not offered in the regular curriculum. Topics will be announced when the course is scheduled. Repeatable if topic is substantially different. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4111H Honors Thesis Seminar III In a seminar setting, students will continue writing and revising their thesis. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in CRJU 3112H; minimum junior standing.
CRJU 4112H Honors Thesis Seminar IV In a seminar setting, students will continue writing and revising their thesis. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of “C” in CRJU 4111H; minimum junior standing.
CRJU 4135 Directed Study in Criminal Justice and Criminology Offers opportunity for individualized, structured examination of a specific topic. Student and instructor mutually agree upon topic and required output. Requires approval of instructor and department chair. Repeatable if topic is substantived different. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4137 Law, Justice, and Society This course explores the historical and philosophical underpinnings of the legal system and analyzes the interrelationships of law, custom, morality, politics, economics, and social change. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4531 Comparative Justice Systems This course examines the institutions of justice in various countries around the world, as well as the variety of international institutions that address questions of justice. The historical development, legal, socio-political, economic, and philosophical factors underlying these institutions are examined, with an emphasis on comparison with the U.S. system of criminal justice. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4532 Organized Crime in a Global Society Study of organized crime in a global context. Examples include but are not limited to: human, arms, and drug trafficking; racketerring; money laundering; environmental crime; and intellectual property crime. Governmental, legal, and institutional responses to the international crimes are also examined. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 4639 Inside-Out The “Inside-Out” Prison Exchange Program is an opportunity for a small group of students and residents from a local prison to exchange ideas and perceptions about crime and justice, the criminal justice system, corrections, and imprisonment. All participants will gain a deeper understanding of the criminal justice system through the combination of theoretical knowledge and practical experience achieved by weekly meetings extended throughout the semester. Departmental and instructor approval is required before enrolling. Strong preference will be given to seniors. The course is repeatable if the topic is substantively different.
CRJU 4792 Internship Provides students an opportunity to work in a supervised setting to bridge academics with practical experiences. Students submit a substantial research paper and/or other writing assignments in addition to professional duties required by their interning agency. Enrollment requires permission of the internship coordinator. To meet Area G requirements, students must have senior status. Students enrolling prior to their senior year will be awarded credit toward their upper division criminal justice and/or general elective requirements. (Repeatable.)
CRJU 4910 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice and Criminology A discussion-based, intensive reading and writing capstone course for criminal justice and criminology majors and minors. Integrates material from the major core courses to critically examine past, current and future developments in the administration of justice. In addition, this seminar will help students explore and prepare for a career in criminal justice. It is strongly suggested students complete BOTH Criminology and Research Methods prior to registering for Senior Seminar. Prerequisite: C or better in CRJU 1100.
CRJU 5003 Cyber Forensics Application of computer investigation and analysis techniques to gather evidence suitable for presentation in a court of law. Techniques of cybercrime scene analysis, media analysis, and the use of various forensic tools. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJU 5003G and 5010G.
CRJU 5010 Applied Digital Forensics I Identification, capture, and recording of evidence from suspect and victim’s computer hard drives and laptops. Students cannot receive credit for both CRJU 5003U/CRJU 5003G and CRJU 5010U/G.
CRJU 5020 Applied Digital Forensics II Expansion of the identification, capture, and recording of evidence from suspect and victim’s mobile devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and PDAs. Graduate students are required to complete an additional substantive research paper, presentation, or project based on course objectives. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in CRJU 5010G.
CRJU 5060 Special Topics in Cybercrime Examines substantive topics, problems, and issues of importance to contemporary study of cybercrime. Topics announced when course is scheduled. Course may be repeated if substantially different. Prerequisite or co-requisite: CRJU 1210, or approval of instructor.
CRJU 5360 Hackers, Malware, and Online Economic Crime Examines cybercrimes that are often influenced by either curiosity or financial motivation. Topics include, but are not limited to, the subculture of computer hackers, the role of malicious software in computer intrusions, and different types of online economic fraud. Prerequisite(s) or Co-requisite(s): CRJU 1210 or approval of instructor.
CRJU 5361 Cybercrimes against Persons and Society Examines cybercrimes in which violence is threatened or exerted against individuals or society. Topics include, but are not limited to, cyber harassment and stalking, pornography, child pornography and exploitation, and cyber terrorism. Prerequisite(s) or Co-requisite(s): CRJU 1210 or approval of instructor.

CRJU 4792: Internship in Justice Studies

Course Description

The internship is a popular option that students may use to satisfy core criminal justice requirements and/ or as an upper division criminal justice elective.  Internships provide students the opportunity to utilize, in a supervised work setting, the knowledge they have gained through their course work. Students work in a variety of settings, including correctional institutions (state and federal), courts, law offices, prosecutors’ offices (investigations and victim assistance programs), sheriff’s departments, local law enforcement, state and federal investigative agencies, private policing, loss prevention in retail settings, juvenile after-care, adult parole, and other criminal justice agencies. The internship experience allows students to gain valuable work experience and develop resources and networks for career opportunities.

Course Eligibility

In order to be eligible for enrollment, students must meet the following requirements:

  1. You must be at least a rising Senior, having completed a minimum of 90 credit hours, including key Justice Studies courses.
  2. You must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher.
  3. You must be able to pass a background check, including polygraph.
  4. You must have health insurance.
  5. You must locate and secure an internship prior to the start of the semester of enrollment.
  6. You must complete the Internship Abstract and receive approval from the Internship Coordinator.

Students who are currently employed with a criminal justice agency must intern with another agency, a different division within their agency of employment, or assume substantially different duties and responsibilities within their agency of employment during the internship period in order to be eligible for internship credit.

Credit Hours

Internships are offered for 3-, 6-, or 9-credit hours. Students must complete a minimum of 150 contact hours (actual time spent working with the internship agency) for every three credit hours of enrollment.

For More Complete Information

Download Internship Packet

Contact Information

Professor Barbara King
Criminal Justice and Criminology Internship Coordinator
Office Location: 1093 Carroll Building
Phone: 912-478-8026
Fax: 912-478-5348
Email: bmking@georgiasouthern.edu.

University Honors Program students majoring in Criminal Justice and Criminology can elect to achieve College Honors by satisfying the requirements listed below. The expectation of the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology is that students achieving honors in Criminal Justice and Criminology will distinguish themselves by conducting advanced research in the topics of justice, crime or the law.

Requirements

  • Admission to College Honors Program by the University Honors Program (see the University Honors Program site for requirements)
  • Completion of twelve hours of honors credit in Criminal Justice and Criminology.
  • Nine of these hours will be satisfied by contracting for honors in upper-level Criminal Justice and Criminology courses (CRJU courses 3000+). The contract stipulates what work above and beyond the standard course requirements qualifies the course for honors credit, and it identifies the criteria by which the student’s performance will be evaluated. All contracts must be completed and signed before the course begins, and copies furnished to the UHP Director, the department chairperson, and the student’s advisor. A contract signed by the student and instructor must be turned in to the Honors Director by Drop Day and the Honors Contract Completion form must be turned in at the conclusion of the course. Typically, contracting for honors in Criminal Justice and Criminology courses will entail an additional research project or, if the course already includes a research project, a more extensive research paper. (See UHP Guidelines for Honors Contracts for more information.)
  • The final three hours of honors credit will be satisfied by completing CRJU 4930, Criminal Justice and Criminology Honors Thesis (this course satisfies the capstone requirement for College Honors). The honors student, with the approval and guidance of a faculty mentor, plans and executes a substantial independent research project on a topic related to justice, crime, or the law. In addition to a 35-50 page research paper, students will complete a poster presentation of their research findings.

Benefits

  • Students completing College Honors in Criminal Justice and Criminology will have the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor to explore their intellectual interests.
  • Students will be provided with a rigorous academic experience that will prepare them well for graduate school, law school, or professional employment.
  • Students will have their achievement recognized by a Honors Program seal on their diplomas and a notation on their transcripts.

Last updated: 1/30/2018

Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology • PO Box 8105 • Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-8007 • cjcrim@georgiasouthern.edu